Advice

The Latest

warrenellis:

This person handily made this post rebloggable, something a few people had asked for.  So.  And thanks.
eytancragg:

some good advice. some very good advice.
Nov 30, 2012 / 359 notes

warrenellis:

This person handily made this post rebloggable, something a few people had asked for.  So.  And thanks.

eytancragg:

some good advice. some very good advice.

(via darrylayo)

Yeah, this is great. But I would quit while you’re ahead. Really, it’s an awful field. Just torture. Awful. You write and write, and you have to throw almost all of it away because it’s not any good. I would say just stop now. You don’t want to do this to yourself. That’s my advice to you.

Phillip Roth’s advice to newly-published author Julian Tepper

Phillip Roth

Nov 19, 2012 / 7 notes

I’ve spent my entire career obsessively trying to “learn how to draw” when I should’ve just been drawing. Always thinking “I just need to get a little better… and then I’ll start working on (insert any of a hundred personal projects)”

The fact is that i’ve been good enough since my teens- and would’ve improved so much more rapidly had my study been in the service of any of those projects- and not in the dozens of sketchbooks pilled in my closet.

Lesson: Don’t use “learning” as an excuse to avoid “doing”.

Shane Glines
Link (via faitherinhicks)

(via teenyrobots)

Oct 19, 2012 / 5,240 notes
Advice for Young Cartoonists
A very unusual commission in that I was asked to draw myself rather than one of my beloved characters and the patron (Pierce) paid extra for me to provide some cartooning advice. 
May 31, 2012 / 274 notes

Advice for Young Cartoonists


A very unusual commission in that I was asked to draw myself rather than one of my beloved characters and the patron (Pierce) paid extra for me to provide some cartooning advice. 

Apr 26, 2012 / 8 notes

Advice to Aspiring Cartoonists

Periodically, I’ll get an e-mail from an aspiring cartoonist asking for guidance regarding becoming a cartoonist. Here’s a reply I recently gave: 
As for offering you advice, I’m happy to answer some questions but I’m afraid I don’t have the time to do much in the way of extensive criticism. The best advice I can give you is to be productive. Do a 24 page comic and when you’re done you should have a good idea of what areas you’ll need to work on. Start posting your stuff on a blog or other website and solicit opinions. Go to a comic convention, or at least comics shop, so you have an idea of what else is out there and what other people are doing. But above all else: produce. There’s an old comics cliche which is true: each of us has 10,000 bad drawings in us and the only way to get good is to get them out of the way. 
Not the most original advice but I do think being productive is the single biggest thing you can do to improve. I don’t really like looking at people’s art at shows (for one thing I’m not good at giving people tough advice and, more importantly, why do you care what I think?) but one thing that always stands out is when someone has lofty goals for a graphic novel and then they show me some character designs and the first four pages. This is like saying “I’m working on an opera, would you mind if I played you the first minute and a half?”
Produce. Produce. Produce. Produce. Produce. The reason the 10,000 page cliche works is that you can’t produce that much and not improve. You’ll actually improve a lot faster, most likely, but it’s nice to convey what a long process making comics is and how much patience you’ll need. Someone who doesn’t have enough raw talent will most likely give up in frustration after 1,000 or 500 or 20 bad drawings. 
I drew this when I was about 13. It’s a long road.